Artists Homes and Studios you can Visit

The space around us is a pillar of inspiration in our creative minds, as well as a reflection of our internal headspace. We did a bit of research, and mapped out some of the the worlds most beautiful and inspiring homes/studios of prominent artists. All of the spaces featured are accessible to the public, so go ahead and add these to your bucket list!

 

FRIDA KAHLO'S CASA AZUL, MEXICO CITY

Casa Azul is the birthplace of painter Frida Kahlo, the home where she grew up, and the place she spent the rest of her life with husband, Diego Rivera. The house is located in Coyoacán, Mexico City, a neighborhood notorious for its intellectual and vanguard reputation since the 1920s. The home stands tall with cobalt blue walls, and is built around a central courtyard and garden. The vibrancy of the house lends ideas of Frida's headspace, and now serves as a dedication to the life and beautiful work of Kahlo.

 
 
 

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE'S GHOST RANCH, ABIQUIU, NEW MEXICO

O'keeffe spent her summers on the Ghost Ranch, seeking isolation from her busy winters in New York. She continuously rented space from the Ranch's original owners for years, slowly convincing them to sell a portion of the property to her. The Ghost Ranch served as inspiration for a very large part of her work and many scenes of red and orange hills, prominent in O'Keeffe's paintings,  can be found in Abiquiqui. “It’s my private mountain,” she said. “God told me if I painted it often enough I could have it.”

 
 
 

SALVADOR DALI'S "CASA DALI", PORTLLIGAT, CATALONIA

The Portlligat House is the house, formerly a number of small fisherman's huts, in Catalonia, Spain where Salvador Dali often lived and worked from 1930 to 1982. The house is structured as a labyrinth, which from one point of departure, the Bear Lobby, spreads out and winds around in a succession of room linked by narrow corridors, slight changes of level, and blind passageways. All rooms in the house have windows of different shapes and proportions framing the same landscape that is a constant point of reference in Dalí’s work: the Portlligat bay.

 
 
 

DONALD JUDD'S 101 SPRING ST., NEW YORK 

Now the Judd Foundation, 101 Spring Street is a glorious example of minimalism, and is considered to be where Judd first developed the concept of permanent installation, an inspiration for much of Judd’s work. Centered on the belief that the placement of a work of art was as critical to its understanding as the work itself, Judd’s first applications of this idea were realized in his installation of works throughout 101 Spring Street, and later in his home in Marfa, Texas. Judd’s installations of artworks, furniture, and decorative objects strike a balance between respect for the historic nature of the landmark cast-iron building and his innovative approaches to architecture and design.

 
 
 

BARBARA HEPWORTH'S HOME AND GARDEN STUDIO, ST. IVES, ENGLAND

This stone carving studio, home, and sculpture garden served as the center of Barbara Hepworth's creative force for much of her life. The property contains the most extensive collection of her work, including pieces from "Contrapuntal Forms", "Fallen Images", and  "Conversations with Magic Stones." The greenroom, the chaos, and the vast range of materials, and the sculptures occupying every room leave a sense of her magic behind. 

 
 
 

FREDERIC LEIGHTON'S HOME, LONDON

Constructed and embellished for over 30 years, The Leighton House serves as a true Palace of Art, and home to Victorian painter Frederic Lord Leighton. Leighton commissioned architect George Aitchison to build the combined home and studio. The intricate and elaborate home now serves as a museum of some of Leighton's most notable oil paintings.

 
 
 

Feature by Jordan Payne

Chrissy LavdovskyComment